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Unplugged Technology Activities

Unplugged Technology Activities


No tech?  No problem!  Here are activities you can do 100% unplugged. Great for days when the WiFi is out or you don't have access to devices.

No tech?  No problem!  Here are activities you can do 100% unplugged. Great for days when the WiFi is out or you don't have access to devices.


K-12

Code.org 

  • In the sidebar, simply select “No computers or devices” under the “Classroom technology” heading for over 60 activities that can be done unplugged.


Coding Fairy Tales

  • Coding meets ELA instruction with VoCode! Turn students into robots to complete these fairy tale coding challenges. 3 Options for the activities mean that you can use this with ANY movable Bots and ANY grade level of students. 

This is a picture from a different set but it gives you the idea of how the cards work with the programmable robots.

Primary

Build Your Own Computer

  • Students assemble and color a paper computer, learning the name and function of each part as they go.


Typing Practice

  • Help your students learn where the keys are on the keyboard and begin developing typing habits with this coloring activity. Uppercase (windows and Mac) and Lowercase (Chromebook) keyboards provided. 


Trackpad Gestures

  • Students practice moving, clicking, swiping, scrolling, right-clicking, and clicking and dragging on paper work mats before they even get on a computer.



STEM Building Challenges

  • Get your students thinking like scientists with STEM challenges that have them building with candy, legos, or the classic spaghetti bridge.


Middle Elementary

Powerful Passwords

  • This lesson has students explore why people use passwords, learn the benefits of using passwords, and discover strategies for creating and keeping strong, secure passwords.


Fill in the Keyboard Letters

  • On each printable worksheet there are 3 keyboards for a total of 15 fill in the letters activities. 




Algorithm Activities

  • Teach students how to create and decompose Algorithms with these print and digital activities. 2 types of printable activities ask students to color pictures following an algorithm.


Upper Elementary

You Can Say That Again! - Text Compression

  • This collection of twenty activities is designed to aid the teaching and learning about data compression through engaging games and puzzles using cards, string, crayons and lots of running around.


Coding Quests

  • This board game practices If/Then/Else language while students move their robots characters through a path filled with obstacles.




Technology Vocabulary Word Searches

  • Students can keep their technology vocabulary terms in mind by completing word searches. 




No tech?  No problem!  Here are activities you can do 100% unplugged. Great for days when the WiFi is out or you don't have access to devices.
Middle School

Digital Citizenship Discussion Prompts

  • All Digital Citizenship Standards are addressed with these 42 task card style discussion prompts.




Keyboard Puzzles

  • With Cut and Paste Keyboard Puzzles it is deceptively tricky for students to cut the puzzle pieces and then find their places to create a completed keyboard.


Early High School

Crack the Code Puzzles

  • Binary Code, Hexadecimal, and Morse Code Encoded Messages with silly phrases as well as technology facts. These are still Tech lessons but on paper!




Sorting Networks

  • Use this CS Unplugged unit to have students explore how computers solve problems faster by having several computers work on different parts of the same task at the same time.


Late High School

Peruvian Coin Flip

  • This activity teaches Cryptographic protocols by showing how to accomplish a simple, but nevertheless seemingly impossible task—making a fair random choice by flipping a coin, between two people who don’t necessarily trust each other.


Science Lab Safety Mannequin Challenge

  • Join the mannequin challenge craze while practicing science lab safety! This resource walks your students through planning, rehearsing, filming, and reflecting on a mannequin challenge.


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No tech?  No problem!  Here are activities you can do 100% unplugged. Great for days when the WiFi is out or you don't have access to devices.

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Brittany Washburn
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15 Meaningful Activities for Short Lesson Periods in the Computer Lab

15 Meaningful Activities for Short Lesson Periods in the Computer Lab


Short lesson period for technology class? That’s no reason to give up on your students engaging in something meaningful in the computer lab!

Short lesson period for technology class? That’s no reason to give up on your students engaging in something meaningful in the computer lab!


Primary

Trackpad Gestures

  • Students practice moving, clicking, swiping, scrolling, right-clicking, and clicking and dragging on paper work mats before they even get on a computer.

Color by trackpad gestures

Mapping the Way Home

  • In this online activity, students use Google Maps to pinpoint their home address and get directions to and from school.


Exploring Pictographs

  • In this interdisciplinary lesson, students try to interpret what a set of pictographs --pictures that symbolize a word or concept -- really mean. They then "write" a few sentences using their own pictograph system.


Middle Elementary

Fill in the Keyboard Letters

  • On each printable worksheet there are 3 keyboards for a total of 15 fill in the letters activities.  With Cut and Paste Keyboard Puzzles it is deceptively tricky for students to cut the puzzle pieces and then find their places to create a completed keyboard.

Fill in the keyboard letters

Create your own Vocabulary Review

  • Students define 4-5 words, create crossword puzzles with a free online tool, and then share their puzzles for review purposes.



Upper Elementary

Technology Vocabulary Word Searches

  • Students can keep their technology vocabulary terms in mind by completing word searches. 


Word Processing Review

  • Review and assess basic word processing skills with this short pre-made assignment.


Middle School

Digital Citizenship Discussion Prompts

  • All Digital Citizenship Standards are addressed with these 42 task card style discussion prompts.


Digital citizenship discussion prompts
TedEd Lessons

  • Pick from over 200 videos about technology. Then use the provided discussion prompts, questions and other resources as time allows.


Programming Practice Writing

  • So much in programming depends on being exact.  Have students write sentences, common phrases, or even single words then change or eliminate one letter to change the meaning (i.e. startling > starting > staring > string > sting > sing > sin > in > I.).  Another version could be punctuating sentences differently in order to change the meaning!


Short lesson period for technology class? That’s no reason to give up on your students engaging in something meaningful in the computer lab!
Early High School

Crack the Code Puzzles

  • Binary Code, Hexadecimal, and Morse Code Encoded Messages with silly phrases as well as technology facts. These are still Tech lessons but on paper!


Hello World

  • A "Hello, World!" program is a computer program that outputs the message "Hello, World!". Such a program is very simple in most programming languages, and is often used by students learning the basic syntax of a programming language.


Judge a Book by its Cover

  • Students build visual literacy and engage in close reading as they investigate the text and imagery on book covers to make judgments about the content they might contain.


Late High School

Respond to a Podcast

  • Have your students listen to a news podcast and use a graphic organizer to record what they learn.


Introduce Tessellations

  • Students use the drawings of M.C. Escher, as well as online research, to deduce what tessellations are. Then each student creates tessellations from both regular and irregular polygons.


Short lesson period for technology class? That’s no reason to give up on your students engaging in something meaningful in the computer lab!

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Brittany Washburn
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The Best Graphic Design Platforms for Students

The Best Graphic Design Platforms for Students


Here are some free and cheap graphic design tools students can use either in class or at home.

Here are some free and cheap graphic design tools students can use either in class or at home. 

Free platforms

Canva 

An amazing tool packed with templates for non-designers to create graphics, presentations, flyers and more.  Both you and your students can find a myriad of uses for this eye-catching technology.  It is free to use, though they do also have a paid option with additional features.


Adobe Spark

It’s easy to make science fair posters, social studies infographics, math flashcards, and so much more with Spark Post. Pick a template or start from scratch.  You can also create web pages and videos.  U.S. teachers with a G Suite for Education (Google) account and supported email domain can set up a Spark classroom account for free, as can licensed educational institutions and nonprofit educational organizations providing school- or district-wide access.  


GIMP 

This is a completely free photo manipulation program similar to Adobe Photoshop.  It is definitely not a plug and play technology, but if you’re looking to get some serious work done with older students this is a great option and there are tutorial videos available.


Blender

Blender is the free and open source 3D creation suite. It supports 3D modeling, rigging, animation, simulation, rendering, compositing and motion tracking, video editing and 2D animation pipeline.  It is another tool that has a pretty steep learning curve, but you can get a lot done with it!


SketchUp 

3D modeling software, free with a G Suite or Microsoft education account.  This one is usable as early as the primary grades, and has a great bank of curriculum to get you and your class inspired.


Vectr, Gravit & Inkscape 

These platforms are all free, fully functional & fantastically rated design apps that specialize in creating vector graphics.


Piskel 

Piskel is a free online editor for animated sprites & pixel art.  You and your student can create animations in your browser or download free desktop & offline applications for Windows, OSX and Linux.  You can export your work as animated GIFs for sharing, spritesheet PNG/ZIP for bigger projects, and you can choose to make any of your sprites public or private.


WordArt.com

A free online word cloud art creator that enables you to easily create amazing and unique word cloud art with your students. 


Here are some free and cheap graphic design tools students can use either in class or at home.
Paid platforms that are also worth a try!

Designsta

This is a monthly subscription, but I have been using it for nearly 3 years and it is FANTASTIC. Create amazing designs in minutes from easily editable templates. Choose from social media graphics, workbooks, worksheets, printables, planners, documents, web graphics, cards, posters, stickers, magazines, menus and more. 


ThingLink

An education technology platform that makes it easy to augment images, videos, and virtual tours with additional information and links. Teachers and students can use ThingLink to create accessible, visual learning experiences.  There are yearly subscription options for individual teachers or whole districts that allow course and assignment creation,  as well as enabling both you and your students to create content.  There is also a free plan for teachers to use, it just doesn’t include any student seats.


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Here are some free and cheap graphic design tools students can use either in class or at home.

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Brittany Washburn
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10 Amazing Lesson Planning Apps for Teachers

10 Amazing Lesson Planning Apps for Teachers


Lesson planning can be a pain...or it can be fun. Here are some lesson planning apps that make the process quick and simple.

Lesson planning can be a pain...or it can be fun. Here are some lesson planning apps that make the process quick and simple.


Nearpod (Apple, Android, Web)

  • Nearpod offers an easy-to-use tool for creating interactive lesson plans, presentations, assessments, and digital content. Create digital lesson plans, share them with students during class, and track individual progress. Lessons are created on slides that can include text, video, images, websites, questions, quizzes, polls, and assignments.  There is also a library of standards aligned lessons to draw from if you don’t want to start your lessons from scratch.


Planboard (Apple, Android, Web)

  • After having written their lesson plans into this app, teachers can view the lessons on the app while they teach. They can then go back into the lesson and make any revisions or edits needed before saving them for re-use later. Teachers can connect with students and parents while organizing lesson plans.


Better Lesson (Apple, Android, Web)

  • ELA, Math and Science K-12 lessons created by high-performing teachers and browsable by standard.  The organization also offers a variety of professional development resources.


Mastery Connect (Apple, Android, Web)

  • A collection of four apps and some in-browser tools to help make aligning your lesson planning to standards hassle-free.  The Core and NGSS standards apps make it easy to access standards anywhere, then the teacher and student apps let you deliver and analyze assessments from tablets and mobile devices.  The pin resource Chrome extension also lets you collect teaching resources without falling down a Pinterest rabbit hole.


Evernote (Apple, Android)

  • Evernote is a basic note-taking app, but it allows you to efficiently collect and organize things from the internet. You can add anything including word documents, PDFs, downloaded images, images taken from mobile devices, audio clips, and more. Notes are organized into notebooks, so just make a notebook for each class you teach then a sub-notebook for each unit. Daily lesson plans are individual notes which go into your class notebook.

Lesson planning can be a pain...or it can be fun. Here are some lesson planning apps that make the process quick and simple.


PlanbookEdu (Android, Web)

  • An online lesson planner that functions much like a paper book would for those just beginning to embrace tech. Teachers can indicate how many periods they have in a day, then create an event within a period to add text, attach a file, and search for a standard by number or keyword to include it. You can then share and print lesson plans.


Common Curriculum (Chrome Extension, Web)

  • This planning tool will help you strike the balance between highly flexible and highly organized.  Drag and reorder the parts of your lessons, move or copy cards between lessons when you need to reteach a skill.  Attach unlimited files in line images, and links to the text to any card.  Keep your teaching standards-based with standards from all 50 states (as well as the ability to add your own).  Track which standards you still need to teach, along with the dates on which you went over the ones you’ve already covered.


LearnZillion (Web)

  • LearnZillion provides teachers with a library of interactive math and language arts lessons, videos, quizzes, and assignments. Select the lesson plan tab on their navigation bar, pick the grade level, then search their library by content topic. All lessons are Common Core aligned.


ReadWriteThink (Web)

  • This site offers lessons and resources for literacy teachers, developed by the International Reading Association and The National Council of Teachers of English.  Information and standards-based lesson plans integrate Internet content into both teaching and learning.


Tailor-ED (Web)

  • A lesson-planning tool that allows teachers to construct differentiated math lessons in just a few clicks. Teachers determine the grade level and standard for each unit, then use the Tailor-ED collection of activities from sources like Khan Academy, Teachers Pay Teachers, Math Antics, and Illustrative Mathematics.

Lesson planning can be a pain...or it can be fun. Here are some lesson planning apps that make the process quick and simple.


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Brittany Washburn
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