-->

Theme Layout

[Leftsidebar]

Boxed or Wide or Framed

[Framed]

Theme Translation

Display Featured Slider

Featured Slider Styles

[Boxedwidth]

Display Grid Slider

Grid Slider Styles

[style2][caption2]

Display Trending Posts

No

Display Author Bio

yes

Display Instagram Footer

Powered by Blogger.
10 Ways to Use Flipgrid to Encourage Classroom Discussions

10 Ways to Use Flipgrid to Encourage Classroom Discussions


Flipgrid is a great way to generate discussions in class through video, especially in distance learning settings.  Here are some different ways that teachers can use this platform with their students.

Flipgrid is a great way to generate discussions in class through video, especially in distance learning settings. Here are some different ways that teachers can use this platform with their students.
  • Create videos to recommend their favorite book. Using Flipgrid’s augmented reality (AR) feature, you can even use a video QR code to create an engaging way to share them. After students record their review, the teacher can print the QR code and tape it onto the corresponding book in their classroom library, and the student’s classmates can use their devices to scan the code and watch the review as a way to help them decide if they’d like to read that book.
  • Discuss a book the class has read. You can leave a guiding question (or a choice of several) to get your students on the right track, then let them respond. If things are going well they can use each other's videos to keep going deeper and bouncing around ideas!
  • Respond to a hot topic issue. Pick a prompt that touches on what is important to your students. You might even consider sending out a survey so your students can vote on which issue they'd like to respond to.
  • Answer an essay question. Your students can practice their speaking skills in addition to their writing skills with a video presentation of their answer to an essay question. With a limit on the length of videos, this is also a great opportunity for students to practice crafting answers that are succinct as well as proficient.
  • Record an ongoing story. The first student can think of a title, then the second record a 30-second beginning, then next builds on that and so on and so forth.
Flipgrid is a great way to generate discussions in class through video, especially in distance learning settings.  Here are some different ways that teachers can use this platform with their students.
  • Activate prior knowledge on a topic. Have your students record a video sharing their background knowledge on a topic before you begin, and view one another’s videos as part of the first lesson. After the unit is over, students can even reply to their original video sharing everything new they learned.
  • Get brainstorming. Students can jump very quickly to planning or building before they get out their ideas in a brainstorming session. Slow them down a bit and capture their thinking by having them throw out and build on one another’s ideas on Flipgrid.
  • Do some debugging. After completing a math task, reading a passage, working through the design process or coding a computer program students can make videos to reflect on the process by identifying errors and sharing how they fixed them. Have students adding annotations either by writing directly on the video when they record it, or adding sticky notes with additional text. This feature is a great way for students to show their thinking.
  • Practice world language skills. With Flipgrid it is possible for teachers in different districts and different countries to collaborate. Students can make videos to practice vocabulary they’re learning, and instead of being limited to practicing with the people in their class they can engage and build their skills with native speakers or other students around the world studying the same language.
  • Catch-up students who are absent. Create a topic for work completed in class, and if a student is absent one of their peers can post a quick video about what assignments were completed in class so the absent students can easily find out what they missed. Build task management and communication skills for the whole class by rotating which students have this responsibility each week.
You might also like the blog post How to Use Google Docs with Elementary Students

Looking for a Flipgrid tutorial? Subscribe to the Technology Toolbox for Teachers. A one-stop library of technology tools tutorials for teachers. Click the image for more information and to see sample tutorials. 


Flipgrid is a great way to generate discussions in class through video, especially in distance learning settings.  Here are some different ways that teachers can use this platform with their students.


Read more »
Brittany Washburn
0 Comments
13 Ways to Integrate Literature and Technology

13 Ways to Integrate Literature and Technology


Even the literary types can enjoy the benefits of technology. Check out how you can integrate literature and technology seamlessly. Here are tips, tools, and resources for teaching literature with technology.
Even the literary types can enjoy the benefits of technology. Check out how you can integrate literature and technology seamlessly. Here are tips, tools, and resources for teaching literature with technology.




  • When you’re writing poetry with your class, an online Rhyming Dictionary , RhymeZone is super helpful to get students thinking with a broader vocabulary.



  • For vocabulary practice (and more) there are many traditional dictionaries and thesauruses online, including ones like Learner's Dictionary that feature definitions worded in a way children can understand.  Vocabulary.com can make studying new definitions fun, and even revolutionize how you and your students treat vocabulary learning if you sign up for a teacher account.

Even the literary types can enjoy the benefits of technology. Check out how you can integrate literature and technology seamlessly. Here are tips, tools, and resources for teaching literature with technology.

  • Khan Academy and HippoCampus have educational videos on a variety of subjects.  Your students can study independently, you can use content for your lessons or you can create playlists for your students to review.  Students can equip themselves with learning tools and flashcards to help them study for almost any topic with Quizlet, or try Grammaropolis for a 21st century Schoolhouse Rock.  


  • BibMe will help your middle and high school students get their citations correct in APA, MLA and Chicago Style.  Meanwhile, Grammarly can help your students eliminate writing errors and find the perfect words to express themselves.


  • Playing educational games using websites, apps or Chrome extensions is an extremely effective way to reinforce learning in an engaging way.  Even if you’re not quite ready to build them into your lesson plans, early finishers can be assigned a game on the topic you are studying as a meaningful reward while you help the stragglers complete their work.  Open up Google and type in “[subject] game for [grade level]“ to find something aligned to your unit (or you can check out our articles on some of the best free reading games out there).  Many sites such as Starfall will not only provide games, but also help your primary kiddos learn to read with interactive “books”.


  • There are several creative platforms out there for contributing to online communities that create storybooks and illustrations, such as My Storybook and Storyboard That.  


  • You can try video conferencing with an author or expert using a website like Nepris or the Digital Human Library.  Or if you already have a subject matter expert in your contacts, you can just use any video conferencing platform you like from Skype to Zoom or Google Meet.


  • Classroom blogs are a great and versatile way to have students post their writing (stories, paragraphs, poetry, etc.), pictures of class projects, or even audio projects (read aloud practice, speech class ventures, etc.).  Many blogging platforms are designed to be very easy to use, like Blogger and Live JournalEdublogs was even made just for classroom and school library blogs. 


  • Turn your next classroom discussion into a podcast.  You can post your podcast on your class website (or blog).  If you use Macintosh, you can just use the included GarageBand software for recording and postproduction.  If you use Windows, you might use the free software Audacity.  You can also do podcasts as weekly classroom news broadcasts, to document a field trip, share book reviews or review curricular content.


  • The internet is also just a great place to find inspiration for lesson planning.  Get new ideas and resources to teach anything from writing haiku for kids to conjugating verbs by simply asking Google “how to teach [subject]”. 

Pin this post to get back to later:
Even the literary types can enjoy the benefits of technology. Check out how you can integrate literature and technology seamlessly. Here are tips, tools, and resources for teaching literature with technology.


Read more »
Brittany Washburn
0 Comments
Technology Inventory Check-Out Systems

Technology Inventory Check-Out Systems


Whether it’s the end of the year, the beginning of the year or just high time for a change here are some tech inventory management and check out system ideas to get you on the road to a better organizational system.

Whether it’s the end of the year, the beginning of the year or just high time for a change here are some tech inventory management and check out system ideas to get you on the road to a better organizational system.


  • A Google or Excel spreadsheet and a generic barcode scanner or barcode scanner app are all you really need.  Check out this guide or grab any free inventory template off the web for some sheets with pre-made formulas


  • AssetTiger is a free, cloud based asset management system that includes maintenance scheduling and check-in & out features. 


  • The Stock and Inventory app on Google Play can be used to inventory any kinds of items, making it an extremely flexible choice.



Whether it’s the end of the year, the beginning of the year or just high time for a change here are some tech inventory management and check out system ideas to get you on the road to a better organizational system.


Alright, now that you’ve chosen an inventory system you’ll need to decide what tech you’re going to inventory.  Classroom teacher tech, student tech, accessories such as remotes and headphones, special tech such as 3D printers and codable bots… do you want to keep track of it all or just certain items?  Do you want it to be set up so teachers can check things out themselves, or do you want to control what goes in and out?  Where will things be stored over the summer?  How often will you track the inventory?  Will you be including usage logs for things that can be checked out?  Ultimately you’ll do what works for your school, and finding out what that is may take a few tries.  Here are some tips you might want to consider as you set things up:


  • Give all your teachers a gallon zip lock back with a check out paper in it. The last day of school they have to bring the bag with all their remotes (projector, Apple TV, teacher and student mic, etc.). 

  • You may actually want to wait until a month or two into school to implement an inventory system, since at the beginning of a school year equipment is still finding its way out of storage and into the correct classrooms.  Teachers may also have a bit more time both to help inventory tech and learn new equipment locations away from the hustle and bustle of the beginning or end of a school year.

  • If you are implementing a system for the first time, it will be a big project.  See how much you can get your classroom teachers to help, and make sure you are allowed some set aside time to implement it.

  • Barcodes and labels are your friend.  Seriously.

  • Including maintenance schedules and notes about broken tech could help you notice patterns in what brands are not working as reliably as you’d like.

Did I miss anything? Let me know in the comments if you have any other recommendations to add.

Pin this blog post to save it:
Whether it’s the end of the year, the beginning of the year or just high time for a change here are some tech inventory management and check out system ideas to get you on the road to a better organizational system.


Read more »
Brittany Washburn
0 Comments
12 Ways to Integrate Art and Technology

12 Ways to Integrate Art and Technology


Art and technology...it's a beautiful combo. Check out some ways you can use technology to create art in your classroom. Here are tips, tools, and resources for creating art with technology.
Art and technology...it's a beautiful combo. Check out some ways you can use technology to create art in your classroom. Here are tips, tools, and resources for creating art with technology.


  • Smithsonian Open Access lets students can view art, history, culture and science pieces as well as participate in themed activities and games.  They also provide educator resources and digital tools through the Smithsonian Learning Lab and  Smithsonian's History Explorer.


  • Google Arts and Culture lets your students explore and interact with art and architecture around the world, with new picks featured every day.  You can also take virtual tours at such prestigious museums as the Louvre and The National Gallery in London.


  • Teachers can even lead their students into the realm of virtual reality with digital drawing (see Virtual Reality in the Classroom). VR programs let students draw a 360-degree world around themselves in real time using headsets and motion control hand sensors.


  • Digital portfolios are an effective way for art teachers to see what their students are working on, and a place for students to organize their work without taking up any space. Teachers can even host virtual art galleries of their students’ work.


  • Technology in the art studio is a great way to let your students experiment with different mediums. There are several apps which students can use to either create their art digitally or manipulate their traditionally made art.  A few favorites include Aviary, Paper 53, Doodle Art, Green Screen, KaleidaCam, PicsArt, and Procreate.



  • Pear Deck or Kahoot help you make both learning and review into fast-paced fun.

Art and technology...it's a beautiful combo. Check out some ways you can use technology to create art in your classroom. Here are tips, tools, and resources for creating art with technology.

  • Khan Academy has educational videos on a variety of art history subjects.  Your students can study independently, you can use content for your lessons or you can create playlists for your students to review.  Students can equip themselves with learning tools and flashcards to help them study for almost any topic with Quizlet


  • You can try video conferencing with an artist or expert using a website like Nepris or the Digital Human Library.  Or if you already have a subject matter expert in your contacts, you can just use any video conferencing platform you like from Skype to Zoom or Google Meet.


  • Classroom blogs are a great and versatile way to have students post their writing, or showcase pictures of their work.  Many blogging platforms are designed to be very easy to use, like Blogger and Live JournalEdublogs was even made just for classroom and school library blogs. 


  • Turn your next classroom discussion into a podcast.  You can post your podcast on your class website (or blog).  If you use Macintosh, you can just use the included GarageBand software for recording and postproduction.  If you use Windows, you might use the free software Audacity.  You can also do podcasts as weekly classroom news broadcasts, to document a field trip, share book reviews or review curricular content.


  • The internet is also just a great place to find inspiration for lesson planning.  Get new ideas and resources to teach anything from pointillism in elementary school  to basic Photoshop by simply asking Google “how to teach [subject]”. 


Pin this post to get back to later:
Art and technology...it's a beautiful combo. Check out some ways you can use technology to create art in your classroom. Here are tips, tools, and resources for creating art with technology.


Read more »
Brittany Washburn
0 Comments
End of Year Digital Activities for Elementary Students

End of Year Digital Activities for Elementary Students



What digital activities should I use with students at the end of the school year? I've seen this question so many times the past few weeks, so I decided to put a list together of great digital activities for elementary students for the end of the year.

Use these any time in May or June to end the year on a high note. Each idea has a list of grade levels and skills addressed, plus the type of technology it uses. 

Digital Memory Book

Grade level: 3-5
Skills: Typing, navigating presentation program, writing
Type: Google Slides or PowerPoint

Summer Timely Tech

Grade Level: K-5
Skills: K/1: Words that start with letter, number words, spelling cvc words, analog time, comparing numbers, making patterns, typing summer words
2/3: Make new words, sort new words 2 ways, School year memories, practice with shape tool, typing summer traditions
4/5: Decoding, fix spelling mistakes, word search puzzle, persuasive essay typing, ABCs of summer typing, practice coding 2 ways, make a poster, make a comic
Type: Google Slides or PowerPoint


Summer Themed Text Formatting

Grade Level: 3-5
Skills: Typing and formatting in a word processor
Type: Google Docs or MS Word


June Digital STEM Challenges

Grade Level: 3-5
Skills: Problem solving, technology literacy, typing, navigating presentation program
Type: Google Slides or PowerPoint, websites


Summer Digital Glyph

Grade Level: 3-5
Skills: Copy and paste, working with shapes, working across slides in presentation program
Type: Google Slides or PowerPoint


Summer Digital Pixel Art

Grade Level: K-5
Skills: Copy and paste, drag and drop, navigating slides, digital design
Type: Google Slides or PowerPoint


Summer Digital Animation

Grade Level: 3-6
Skills: Copy and paste, fill tool, resizing shapes, layered shapes, duplicate slides, work with arrows, follow directions
Type: Google Slides or PowerPoint, optional website to turn it into a GIF


Summer CVC Words Digital Secret Picture Tile Puzzles

Grade level: Kindergarten
Skills: Drag and drop and basic keyboard letter recognition
Type: Google Slides or PowerPoint


Technology Class Awards Freebie
Grade Level: K-8
Give your students awards at the end of the year!

Here are a few ideas that technology teachers can use during the last month or so of school to challenge and engage students as they culminate their year of tech learning.  Tech needs and interests differ as students grow, so there’s a little something for every age level. 


Primary

Computer Science Skills: 

Typing Games

  • Students can choose typing games for a variety of themes and ability levels to set them up for success as they become increasingly literate.


Coding: 

ScratchJr Challenges

  • Scratch Jr is an ideal coding platform for pre-readers, with symbols instead of written words on snap-together code blocks.  Provide a couple of challenge choices (make up your own or search the internet for inspiration) for your kiddos to see how much they are able to figure out on their own!


Interdisciplinary:

Wixie Projects

  • Wixie helps students share their ideas and learning through a combination of writing, voice, and digital art.  It has several meaningful lesson plans pre-made for you to choose from.  Though it is a paid service, you can sign up for a 30 or 90 day free trial to perform this end of the year flourish.


Middle Elementary

Computer Science Skills:

Excel Mystery Pictures

  • Master the toolbar in Google Sheets or Microsoft Excel. The activity has them filling 100 cells in the table per design!


Coding:

Tynker's Dragon Dash

  • Students design their own dragon and then use coding to lead it through a series of complex puzzles.


Interdisciplinary:

My Storybook or Storyboard That.

  • Use one of several creative platforms made for contributing to online communities that create storybooks and illustrations   


Upper Elementary

Computer Science Skills:

Build a Website

  • Your students can go through this step by step tutorial to create their own website using HTML and CSS to create a website about people who inspire them.


Coding:

Code Your Own Arcade Game

  • Have students invent and create their very own arcade games with this Microsoft coding platform.


Interdisciplinary:

magicplan  Floor Plans 

  • Use augmented reality to have your students practice their math skills to create detailed floor plans.


Middle School

Computer Science Skills:

Instructables Tech Projects 

  • .Have your students choose a design, electronics or fabrication project from Instructables to complete.


Coding:

Codesters

  • Let your students begin building interactive projects in Python.


Interdisciplinary:

Canva Infographics

  • Let students make their own infographic about any topic they’ve learned about this year.


Early High School

Computer Science Skills:

Alice Challenge 

  • The Alice Challenge is an opportunity for students to showcase their skills at creating 3D animations, engaging games, or immersive experiences using the Alice programming environment.


Coding:

Mobile CS Principles

  • In this Hour of Code activity, engage students in building a musical Android or iOS mobile app.


Interdisciplinary:

Every Dollar Budgeting

  • Work on budgeting in this app to hit some social studies standards.  Excel or Google Sheets are also a great place to practice these skills!


Late High School

Computer Science Skills:

Cyber Security Research

  • Help your students conduct a research study investigating how secure people think security questions are, and compare that to the reality of how easily you can find answers to these questions online.


Coding: 

Cryptocurrency & Blockchain Technology with CodeHS 

  • Students learn about the foundations of cryptocurrencies by exploring cryptography, hashing, and blockchain technology.


Interdisciplinary:

AR Human Anatomy 

  • Help students take their understanding of Biology to the next level with this augmented reality look at the human body.


Need help finding something else? Let me know!

Pin this post to get back to later!

Read more »
Brittany Washburn
0 Comments

Follow @brittanywashburntech