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Showing posts with label Websites. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Websites. Show all posts
The Best Graphic Design Platforms for Students

The Best Graphic Design Platforms for Students


Here are some free and cheap graphic design tools students can use either in class or at home.

Here are some free and cheap graphic design tools students can use either in class or at home. 

Free platforms

Canva 

An amazing tool packed with templates for non-designers to create graphics, presentations, flyers and more.  Both you and your students can find a myriad of uses for this eye-catching technology.  It is free to use, though they do also have a paid option with additional features.


Adobe Spark

It’s easy to make science fair posters, social studies infographics, math flashcards, and so much more with Spark Post. Pick a template or start from scratch.  You can also create web pages and videos.  U.S. teachers with a G Suite for Education (Google) account and supported email domain can set up a Spark classroom account for free, as can licensed educational institutions and nonprofit educational organizations providing school- or district-wide access.  


GIMP 

This is a completely free photo manipulation program similar to Adobe Photoshop.  It is definitely not a plug and play technology, but if you’re looking to get some serious work done with older students this is a great option and there are tutorial videos available.


Blender

Blender is the free and open source 3D creation suite. It supports 3D modeling, rigging, animation, simulation, rendering, compositing and motion tracking, video editing and 2D animation pipeline.  It is another tool that has a pretty steep learning curve, but you can get a lot done with it!


SketchUp 

3D modeling software, free with a G Suite or Microsoft education account.  This one is usable as early as the primary grades, and has a great bank of curriculum to get you and your class inspired.


Vectr, Gravit & Inkscape 

These platforms are all free, fully functional & fantastically rated design apps that specialize in creating vector graphics.


Piskel 

Piskel is a free online editor for animated sprites & pixel art.  You and your student can create animations in your browser or download free desktop & offline applications for Windows, OSX and Linux.  You can export your work as animated GIFs for sharing, spritesheet PNG/ZIP for bigger projects, and you can choose to make any of your sprites public or private.


WordArt.com

A free online word cloud art creator that enables you to easily create amazing and unique word cloud art with your students. 


Here are some free and cheap graphic design tools students can use either in class or at home.
Paid platforms that are also worth a try!

Designsta

This is a monthly subscription, but I have been using it for nearly 3 years and it is FANTASTIC. Create amazing designs in minutes from easily editable templates. Choose from social media graphics, workbooks, worksheets, printables, planners, documents, web graphics, cards, posters, stickers, magazines, menus and more. 


ThingLink

An education technology platform that makes it easy to augment images, videos, and virtual tours with additional information and links. Teachers and students can use ThingLink to create accessible, visual learning experiences.  There are yearly subscription options for individual teachers or whole districts that allow course and assignment creation,  as well as enabling both you and your students to create content.  There is also a free plan for teachers to use, it just doesn’t include any student seats.


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Here are some free and cheap graphic design tools students can use either in class or at home.

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Brittany Washburn
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13 Ways to Integrate Literature and Technology

13 Ways to Integrate Literature and Technology


Even the literary types can enjoy the benefits of technology. Check out how you can integrate literature and technology seamlessly. Here are tips, tools, and resources for teaching literature with technology.
Even the literary types can enjoy the benefits of technology. Check out how you can integrate literature and technology seamlessly. Here are tips, tools, and resources for teaching literature with technology.




  • When you’re writing poetry with your class, an online Rhyming Dictionary , RhymeZone is super helpful to get students thinking with a broader vocabulary.



  • For vocabulary practice (and more) there are many traditional dictionaries and thesauruses online, including ones like Learner's Dictionary that feature definitions worded in a way children can understand.  Vocabulary.com can make studying new definitions fun, and even revolutionize how you and your students treat vocabulary learning if you sign up for a teacher account.

Even the literary types can enjoy the benefits of technology. Check out how you can integrate literature and technology seamlessly. Here are tips, tools, and resources for teaching literature with technology.

  • Khan Academy and HippoCampus have educational videos on a variety of subjects.  Your students can study independently, you can use content for your lessons or you can create playlists for your students to review.  Students can equip themselves with learning tools and flashcards to help them study for almost any topic with Quizlet, or try Grammaropolis for a 21st century Schoolhouse Rock.  


  • BibMe will help your middle and high school students get their citations correct in APA, MLA and Chicago Style.  Meanwhile, Grammarly can help your students eliminate writing errors and find the perfect words to express themselves.


  • Playing educational games using websites, apps or Chrome extensions is an extremely effective way to reinforce learning in an engaging way.  Even if you’re not quite ready to build them into your lesson plans, early finishers can be assigned a game on the topic you are studying as a meaningful reward while you help the stragglers complete their work.  Open up Google and type in “[subject] game for [grade level]“ to find something aligned to your unit (or you can check out our articles on some of the best free reading games out there).  Many sites such as Starfall will not only provide games, but also help your primary kiddos learn to read with interactive “books”.


  • There are several creative platforms out there for contributing to online communities that create storybooks and illustrations, such as My Storybook and Storyboard That.  


  • You can try video conferencing with an author or expert using a website like Nepris or the Digital Human Library.  Or if you already have a subject matter expert in your contacts, you can just use any video conferencing platform you like from Skype to Zoom or Google Meet.


  • Classroom blogs are a great and versatile way to have students post their writing (stories, paragraphs, poetry, etc.), pictures of class projects, or even audio projects (read aloud practice, speech class ventures, etc.).  Many blogging platforms are designed to be very easy to use, like Blogger and Live JournalEdublogs was even made just for classroom and school library blogs. 


  • Turn your next classroom discussion into a podcast.  You can post your podcast on your class website (or blog).  If you use Macintosh, you can just use the included GarageBand software for recording and postproduction.  If you use Windows, you might use the free software Audacity.  You can also do podcasts as weekly classroom news broadcasts, to document a field trip, share book reviews or review curricular content.


  • The internet is also just a great place to find inspiration for lesson planning.  Get new ideas and resources to teach anything from writing haiku for kids to conjugating verbs by simply asking Google “how to teach [subject]”. 

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Even the literary types can enjoy the benefits of technology. Check out how you can integrate literature and technology seamlessly. Here are tips, tools, and resources for teaching literature with technology.


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Brittany Washburn
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12 Ways to Integrate Art and Technology

12 Ways to Integrate Art and Technology


Art and technology...it's a beautiful combo. Check out some ways you can use technology to create art in your classroom. Here are tips, tools, and resources for creating art with technology.
Art and technology...it's a beautiful combo. Check out some ways you can use technology to create art in your classroom. Here are tips, tools, and resources for creating art with technology.


  • Smithsonian Open Access lets students can view art, history, culture and science pieces as well as participate in themed activities and games.  They also provide educator resources and digital tools through the Smithsonian Learning Lab and  Smithsonian's History Explorer.


  • Google Arts and Culture lets your students explore and interact with art and architecture around the world, with new picks featured every day.  You can also take virtual tours at such prestigious museums as the Louvre and The National Gallery in London.


  • Teachers can even lead their students into the realm of virtual reality with digital drawing (see Virtual Reality in the Classroom). VR programs let students draw a 360-degree world around themselves in real time using headsets and motion control hand sensors.


  • Digital portfolios are an effective way for art teachers to see what their students are working on, and a place for students to organize their work without taking up any space. Teachers can even host virtual art galleries of their students’ work.


  • Technology in the art studio is a great way to let your students experiment with different mediums. There are several apps which students can use to either create their art digitally or manipulate their traditionally made art.  A few favorites include Aviary, Paper 53, Doodle Art, Green Screen, KaleidaCam, PicsArt, and Procreate.



  • Pear Deck or Kahoot help you make both learning and review into fast-paced fun.

Art and technology...it's a beautiful combo. Check out some ways you can use technology to create art in your classroom. Here are tips, tools, and resources for creating art with technology.

  • Khan Academy has educational videos on a variety of art history subjects.  Your students can study independently, you can use content for your lessons or you can create playlists for your students to review.  Students can equip themselves with learning tools and flashcards to help them study for almost any topic with Quizlet


  • You can try video conferencing with an artist or expert using a website like Nepris or the Digital Human Library.  Or if you already have a subject matter expert in your contacts, you can just use any video conferencing platform you like from Skype to Zoom or Google Meet.


  • Classroom blogs are a great and versatile way to have students post their writing, or showcase pictures of their work.  Many blogging platforms are designed to be very easy to use, like Blogger and Live JournalEdublogs was even made just for classroom and school library blogs. 


  • Turn your next classroom discussion into a podcast.  You can post your podcast on your class website (or blog).  If you use Macintosh, you can just use the included GarageBand software for recording and postproduction.  If you use Windows, you might use the free software Audacity.  You can also do podcasts as weekly classroom news broadcasts, to document a field trip, share book reviews or review curricular content.


  • The internet is also just a great place to find inspiration for lesson planning.  Get new ideas and resources to teach anything from pointillism in elementary school  to basic Photoshop by simply asking Google “how to teach [subject]”. 


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Art and technology...it's a beautiful combo. Check out some ways you can use technology to create art in your classroom. Here are tips, tools, and resources for creating art with technology.


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Brittany Washburn
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Top Technology Resources for Students with Learning Disabilities

Top Technology Resources for Students with Learning Disabilities


I've been working on this post for a while because I wanted to make sure to bring you a cohesive toolkit. Below you will find lists of assistive tech, apps, websites, and assessment tools all curated with exceptional students in mind. Many of these tools would be great for ANY learner!

If it isn't linked, do a quick google search for the title and you'll find it. Some extensions and features were hard to link.

Assistive Technology

Extensions for Chromebooks:

  • Read Aloud - read out loud the current web-page article with one click
  • Adobe Spark
  • Dyslexia Friendly - increases readability of web pages by changing fonts, contrast, and adding a reading ruler
  • Mercury Reader - removes ads and distractions, leaving only text and images for a clean and consistent reading view on every site
  • DocHub

Chromebook Accessibility Features

In the settings menu you can adjust the browser features for students with audio/visual needs. There are many features including: 

  • chromeVox
  • large mouse cursor
  • high contrast mode
  • screen magnifier 
Place a checkmark next to the feature that you wish to activate. This feature will activate for the account that is logged in. It will remember this feature until you uncheck it.


Assistive Technology For iPads

There are some great built-in features that come with iPads. You can adjust them in the settings. I particularly recommend the following:
Picture
  • Voiceover
  • Zoom
  • Grayscale
  • Larger Text
  • Speak Selection
  • Assistive Touch
  • Dictation
  • Word Prediction

Learning Apps that are Great for Students with Learning Delays

Math:

Candy Count
Image result for candy count app
Tiggly Math
Image result for tiggly math app
Touch Math
Image result for touch math app

Vocabulary and Language:

BlubBlub
Skitch
FlipGrid
Image result for flipgrid app

Tracing and Fine Motor Skills:

Sand Draw
Letter Toy and School
Image result for sand draw app

Communication:

FaceTime
Educreations
Draw and Tell
Image result for educreations app

Puzzles and Coding:

Kodable
Hopscotch 
BeeBot

Image result for kodable app

Learning Websites that are Great for Students with Learning Delays

Keyboarding:

Computer Circus
Crazy Typing

Literacy and Math:


Classroom Technology

This is a list of resources the teacher can use to engage students in the classroom. Use these to push out, interact, and collect assignments. 
Seesaw
Nearpod
Appear.in
Quizizz
Bubbl.us
Vocaroo

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Brittany Washburn
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