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Showing posts with label Back to School. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Back to School. Show all posts
Top 8 Quiz Maker Tools for Teachers

Top 8 Quiz Maker Tools for Teachers


Paper quizzes and answer keys are so time consuming, and time is a commodity no teacher has an excess of.  These online quiz maker tools will help you get back a little .  Maybe you’ll even get to drink that cup of coffee while it’s still hot!

Paper quizzes and answer keys are so time consuming, and time is a commodity no teacher has an excess of.  These online quiz maker tools will help you get back a little .  Maybe you’ll even get to drink that cup of coffee while it’s still hot!


Quiz Making Tools

You can manage classes and quizzes, attach multimedia files to questions,  utilize robust report tools, and make quizzes in multiple languages.

Create exams & assessments with advanced quiz settings such as time limits, public & private test access, randomize questions, instant feedback,  video, audio, and ability to embed exams in Wordpress & Google Sites.  Essay, multiple choice, matching, short answer & more question types.

This one has a question bank and templates as well as custom quiz creation, and includes aesthetic customization options.  Randomize questions, shuffle answer options and set a time limit for answers.  Add feedback for each question based on learner scores.

Visually appealing quizzes plus in-depth reporting and analytics.  The platform also allows you to create other learning tools such as mind maps, flash cards, slides and even a full course builder.

Great for chromebook and otherwise Google dependent classrooms. You can insert files from Google Drive, choose from ten question types, and make an answer key on certain question types.  Flubaroo quickly grades multiple-choice or fill-in-blank assignments.

You can create interactive multiple-choice, short-answer, jumbled-sentence, crossword, matching/ordering and gap-fill exercises.  It also allows you to set time limits, assign weights to different question types, offer hints at the expense of losing some points and set penalties for incorrect answers.  


Quiz Makers for Engaging Test Prep & Review

Great for both in-person and distance learning, since students answer questions on their own devices. 

Host live events where students answer timed questions or give student-paced challenges.  You can create a quiz from scratch, use their question bank to mix and match questions, edit a template, or reuse existing games.  Visual reports help you assess how the class performed, and identify difficult questions.  

Students answer questions at their own pace, and each student will get exposure to the questions multiple times to ensure mastery.  Assignments are taken care of and graded for you. Remote lesson plans with your content can be created in minutes.


You know what will work best in your classroom.  If you try one thing and find it isn't working as well for you as you'd hoped, then try something else next time. Whenever you are considering a new quiz maker, here are the things you should be on the lookout for:

  • Supporting all the question types you may need

  • Auto-grading

  • Ease of quiz creation

  • Ease of login for students

  • Meaningful student data 

  • Functionality such as changing due dates for absent students, or allowing retakes

  • Students and parents can log in to see graded quiz results

  • Ability to copy quizzes for re-use in other years/classes

  • Option to include images, sound bites or media clips

  • Engaging options for conducting quiz-like prep & review sessions

Pin this blog post to get back to later:
Paper quizzes and answer keys are so time consuming, and time is a commodity no teacher has an excess of.  These online quiz maker tools will help you get back a little .  Maybe you’ll even get to drink that cup of coffee while it’s still hot!



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Brittany Washburn
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Back to School Technology Activities to Jumpstart the School Year

Back to School Technology Activities to Jumpstart the School Year


Here are a few ideas that technology teachers can use during the first month of school to get students excited for a year of tech learning.  Tech needs and interests differ as students grow, so there’s a little something for every age level.  Each level also includes an unplugged activity in case you are still smoothing out your tech at the beginning of the year!

Here are a few ideas that technology teachers can use during the first month of school to get students excited for a year of tech learning.  Tech needs and interests differ as students grow, so there’s a little something for every age level.  Each level also includes an unplugged activity in case you are still smoothing out your tech at the beginning of the year!


Primary

Unplugged: 

Build Your Own Computer (Brittany’s Own!)

  • Students assemble and color a paper computer, learning the name and function of each part as they go.


Coding: 

ScratchJr

  • Coding for pre-readers, with symbols instead of written words on snap-together code blocks.


Something Fun:

Mouse Control Games

  • A small collection of games from Funbrain to help your young learners master control of their mouse and/or trackpad.


Middle Elementary

Unplugged:

Powerful Passwords

  • This lesson has students explore why people use passwords, learn the benefits of using passwords, and discover strategies for creating and keeping strong, secure passwords


Coding:

LightBot

  • A puzzle game based on coding; it secretly teaches you programming logic as you play.


Something Fun: 

Make an Avatar Digital Glyph Activity (Brittany’s Own!)

  • Students will be asked to work across slides in either Google Slides or PowerPoint, copy and paste between slides, resize pieces, layer pieces, group pieces, and save their finished work as an image file. All while completing an engaging get-to-know-you activity.




Upper Elementary

Unplugged:

You Can Say That Again! - Text Compression

  • This collection of twenty activities is designed to aid the teaching and learning about data compression through engaging games and puzzles using cards, string, crayons and lots of running around.


Coding:

Minecraft: AI for Good

  • Program the Minecraft Agent to collect data about forest fires. 


Something Fun:

Digital Breakout Challenges (Brittany’s Own!)

  • Using technology and problem solving skills, students decipher codes to help save Max from cyberspace. This is a great activity to introduce students to the escape the classroom challenges, and it is fully digital!  This breakout activity can be done in Google Slides or PowerPoint.




Middle School

Unplugged:

Digital Citizenship Discussion Prompts (Brittany’s Own!)

  • All Digital Citizenship Standards are addressed with these 42 task card style discussion prompts.




Coding:

Dance Party

  • Code a Dance Party and share it with friends. Featuring Katy Perry, Shawn Mendes, Lil Nas X, Panic! At The Disco, Jonas Brothers, and many more.


Something Fun:

Kahoot!

  • Let students make their own quizzes.


Early High School

Unplugged:

Crack the Code Puzzles (Brittany’s Own!)

  • Binary Code, Hexadecimal, and Morse Code Encoded Messages with silly phrases as well as technology facts. These are still Tech lessons but on paper!




Coding:

NASA Moon 2 Mars

  • Students can design their own animated mission patch, imagine their life as an Artemis astronaut on the Lunar Gateway, and more. 


Something Fun:

Lyrics Training

  • Improve and practise listening skills with the best music videos. Students fill in the gaps to the lyrics as they listen to their favourite songs.


Late High School

Unplugged 

Peruvian Coin Flip

  • This activity teaches Cryptographic protocols by showing how to accomplish a simple, but nevertheless seemingly impossible task—making a fair random choice by flipping a coin, between two people who don’t necessarily trust each other.


Coding: 

Python + Biology 

  • Students develop programming skills and build their own animal classifier. 

Let's Build a Drone!

  • Build a drone frame in ten steps with NCLab's 3D Modeling app.


Something Fun:

Science Lab Safety Mannequin Challenge (Brittany’s Own!)

  • Join the mannequin challenge craze while practicing science lab safety! This resource walks your students through planning, rehearsing, filming, and reflecting on a mannequin challenge.


Pin this blog post to get back to later:
Here are a few ideas that technology teachers can use during the first month of school to get students excited for a year of tech learning.  Tech needs and interests differ as students grow, so there’s a little something for every age level.  Each level also includes an unplugged activity in case you are still smoothing out your tech at the beginning of the year!



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Brittany Washburn
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12 Tech Tools for Keeping Parents in the Loop and Boosting Teacher-Parent Communication

12 Tech Tools for Keeping Parents in the Loop and Boosting Teacher-Parent Communication


As teachers, part of our job is making sure that parents are kept in the loop about their child's progress and behavior.  Luckily, there are lots of tech tools out there to help you do this!

As teachers, part of our job is making sure that parents are kept in the loop about their child's progress and behavior.  Luckily, there are lots of tech tools out there to help you do this!


If you want to keep things simple, class blogs as a way to keep your parents up to date have been around for quite a while.  Many platforms are designed to be very easy to use, like Blogger and Live JournalEdublogs was even made just for classroom and school library blogs.  


You can also utilize familiar video calling technology such as Skype, etc. for more convenient parent teacher conferences.


There are several apps created specifically as a platform for parent-teacher communication, such as Bloomz, SimplyCircle, and Remind.  

  • Bloomz has class updates, photo & video sharing, student portfolios, behavior tracking, two way messaging, a class calendar, manages parent-teacher conference scheduling and also has volunteer and item sign-ups.  

  • SimplyCircle lets you share messages, pictures & files, as well as add tasks, organize events & assign roles. You create Circles by adding email addresses so members of your circle do not need to be a member of Simply Circle to view the emails.  

  • Remind styles itself as a simple but effective engagement system that’s like text messaging for school communities.


Some learning management systems like Seesaw, ThinkWave and Schoology have integrated parent communication features.  

  • Seesaw’s communication features include two way messaging, class announcements, a journal students can add video reflections and group projects for their own families to see, and can translate your messages into over 55 languages with the press of a button.  

  • ThinkWave lets parents view messages, download handouts & files, see upcoming tests, assignments & activities, and view day-to-day results, attendance, & final grades.  

  • Schoology advertises the ability to communicate with students, faculty, parents, and other shareholders all at once with mass updates, in­-platform messages, and mobile notifications, and additionally lets you create parent groups so parents can collaborate with one another.  It also features an assignment calendar to help keep everyone up to date.


Popular with teachers who love gamification are avatar-based behavioral management systems like ClassDojo, or for older students Classcraft.  These systems let you award student-created avatars with points for desirable behavior and take away points for undesirable behavior.  Both of the aforementioned systems also let you connect parent accounts so they can see exactly how their students are acting when in school and allow for private messaging between the teacher and individual parents.  You can also use class-wide parent announcements to keep parents in the loop and upload attachments with your messages, such as handouts, worksheets, or permission slips.


You know what will work best in your classroom.  If you try one thing and find it isn't working as well for you as you'd hoped, then try something else next year (or next semester). Whenever you are considering a new teacher-parent communication system, here are the things you should look for:

  • free

  • easy to install and use

  • capable of two-way communication

  • can share files such as pics, videos, and documents

  • accessible on multiple devices

  • can send individual and mass messages can create or notify parents about events, etc. 


Pin this blog post to get back to later:
As teachers, part of our job is making sure that parents are kept in the loop about their child's progress and behavior.  Luckily, there are lots of tech tools out there to help you do this!

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Brittany Washburn
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3 Tips for the First Week in Technology

3 Tips for the First Week in Technology


3 Tips for the First Week in Technology

The first week in the technology lab is so important. Get started on the right track with these 3 tips:


3 Tips for the First Week in Technology

Tip #1: Logins

Your students are going to need to log in to the computer. While it may be tempting to hold of on having them log in the first week, you shouldn't! This procedure is the most important one in your classroom, so they need the consistency from day one. 

I always print out my class lists with student log in information because I teach my students how to look up their number without my help. I put a folder on the back counter with all of the lists, separated by day of the week that they come to the lab. Each sheet has the teacher's name at the top and then the list of student names and usernames (no passwords). I encourage students to memorize their usernames and passwords, but some just never get it. By giving them the option to look up their username every week, it takes the stress out of it, and they don't have to bother me to get it. 

You at least will need the list in digital format for the first week so that you can look up the login information for the students who do not remember theirs. Since classes change so much in the beginning of the year, I could see the benefit of holding off printing them until things are more settled. 
3 Tips for the First Week in Technology

Tip #2: Rules

I'm sure you thought long and hard about what your computer lab rules should be. The first day, your students come in, sit down, and you go over the rules. Then what?


My advice to you is to have your students DO something with the class rules. For example, my older students (grades 4 and 5) make a poster using MS Word or PowerPoint on the first day. They are allowed to play with the fonts, clip art, and borders as long as their finished product has the class rules.

By the way, this makes a great display to show off in the hallway! With my younger students, they draw a picture of the most important rule. 2nd and 3rd graders caption theirs, but K and 1 just draw out a picture representation of which rule they feel is most important. I love to use the ABCYa! Paint tool for this, but you could certainly use a different program or even do it on paper. 

3 Tips for the First Week in Technology

Tip #3: Early Finishers

You've planned this amazing first day lesson. Your students are logged in to their accounts and using digital tools! Then, 2-3 kids raise their hand to say they are done, and there are still 15 minutes left before the session ends. 

Always have a firm plan for early finishers. I have a page set up on my class website with early finisher activities- websites with learning games. I also have a classroom library with great kids books related to technology themes. I make sure my students know from day one that these are their only two options. No "helping" friends, which is really just a distraction in the computer lab. No bothering me, either. Is that terrible? I like a peaceful classroom where everyone is working hard and knows what to do. 

3 Tips for the First Week in Technology

So, now you have three solid tips for starting the year on the right track with your technology students. These are things you can have prepared before the students even start. Did I forget anything crucial? Let me know in the comments. 

Looking for some ready-made first week activities? Click here to go to my curriculum website. You can find the free activities on the Home dropdown menu.


3 Tips for the First Week in Technology

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Brittany Washburn
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