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5 Tips on Assessing Google Slides Presentations


Google Slides is free, easy to use, and a great place to start for your students to showcase their research, learning, and creativity. Even if you use another slide presentation application, use these 5 tips to cement your rubric!
With the new normal relating to coronavirus, we as teachers are doing our very best to get creative in our communication, assignments, and assessment. Google Slides is free, easy to use, and a great place to start for your students to showcase their research, learning, and creativity. Even if you use another slide presentation application, use these 5 tips to cement your rubric!

1) It’s All About The Content

Just like any work your students do, you are going to be assessing the content of the presentation. That content is going to let you know how well the student understands the content of the class. Whether their content is a ton of words in the presentation, or they give a speech with little enhancement with the slides, that’s where the bulk of their grade is going from.

For example, if they are doing a math presentation, some students may struggle making the presentation look pretty, but they know the content and what they are talking about in the presentation. An exception to this rule might be if the presentation is about Google Slide presentations...That would need both a good content and demonstration of their knowledge of Google Slides.

2) Give Points For Creativity!

Maybe this student is weak on content and understanding, but they are amazing in the beautification of a presentation. As a teacher, you can tell that the student put a lot of effort into building their Google Slides. They picked a nice theme, they added in effective transitions and sounds, they have pictures and videos that explain the theme of the presentation. They may not totally understand, but they nailed it with their Google Slides.

3) Creativity Should Enhance The Presentation (Not Distract!)

If the audience can’t read it, or are distracted with silliness, then the content doesn’t matter. Students don’t always understand that they can’t just choose the colors of their favorite basketball team, but they need to think about their audience. You might be able to read black on red, but your audience can’t read back on red. If the background and the text aren’t TOTALLY CLEAR, then it doesn’t work.

Let’s your students know that it’s okay to simply pick a theme and color scheme from the Google Slide templates. The themes and color schemes exist because they are readable and not distractions. Then they can get to work on the meat of the presentation.
This can be kind of a difficult thing for a younger student to understand, but just because you got a big laugh with a crazy transition sound, doesn’t mean it’s a good fit for your presentation on the Holocaust or Climate Change. My personal opinion is that it’s fine to know how to add sounds to Powerpoint, but more often than not, sounds in the background or for transitions are super distracting. Use them sparingly!

4) Connecting Voice To The Presentation

Maybe you have a very clever student presenter and all they have on their Google Slides are relevant memes or pictures. Any good slide presentation is really an enhancement of the presenter’s voice. The voice of the student and how they use the Google Slides to help and make the content memorable is super important.

A presentation challenge for the students: have them do a presentation that is ONLY pictures or memes. This type of Google Slide presentation is really impressive way to demonstrate their knowledge, organizational skills, and presenting ability.

5) Be Open To Something Off The Wall

In general, less is probably more in a Google Slide presentation, but there are still so many ways for students to express their creativity in Google Slides to make a great presentation.

Maybe you have a student who is usually nervous giving live presentations. Give them the opportunity to record their presentation instead of be live. They could even make a slide with a video recording for each section of their presentation.

Ask yourself:

Did they have effective media and pictures in the slides?
Did they use transitions and animations appropriately?
Did they embed a video or music to enhance the presentation?
Did they make a graph or pie chart?
Did they add boxes or bullet points or shapes for emphasis?

Google Slides is a simple easy to use tool, and if students have a grasp on the variety they can create within it, then they’ll be able to transition to other presentation applications with greater ease.

To help students understand all the ways to make a presentation presentable, you can do a presentation on what makes a good (or bad) Google Slide Presentation. Have fun with it!

How do you assess presentations in your classroom? Are you mostly looking for content, or do you also grade the actual slide presentation?  Let me know in the comments!


Google Slides is free, easy to use, and a great place to start for your students to showcase their research, learning, and creativity. Even if you use another slide presentation application, use these 5 tips to cement your rubric!

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Brittany Washburn
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Web Based Digital Activities for Any Device and How To Make Your Own


Are you so sick of hearing students or parents say that an activity you sent them won't work on their device? The struggle is real when we are asking them to download apps, log in to platforms, and open browsers across different device types. The only thing that currently works on any type of device and in any browser is HTML5.
Are you so sick of hearing students or parents say that an activity you sent them won't work on their device? The struggle is real when we are asking them to download apps, log in to platforms, and open browsers across different device types. The only thing that currently works on any type of device and in any browser is HTML5.

We spend so much time looking for and testing out digital activities for our students. There is almost nothing worse than finding the perfect activity for a standard and then finding out half of your students don't have the right program, app, or device to be able to use it!

Even worse, students needing accounts to be able to use a platform means that we have to get their information to them and hope they keep track of it or remember it.

Wouldn't it be so much easier to find (or create) activities that you know will work on any device and just need to share the URL with students? I'd love to teach you how! Fair warning - my tutorials aren't free. Keep reading if you're still interested.

For the tools I'm about to share, the official tutorials are in my Premium Member's Library - The Technology Toolbox for Teachers. If you're a teacher or a homeschooling parent wanting to learn about edtech tools, the Tech Toolbox membership is for you!

Do you want to be able to make activities like:
  • Drag and Drop
  • Find the Hotspot
  • Memory Match
  • Flashcards
  • Image Sequencing
  • Image Pairing (matching)
  • Word Search
  • Drag the Words
  • Fill in the Blanks
  • And more!
Are you so sick of hearing students or parents say that an activity you sent them won't work on their device? The struggle is real when we are asking them to download apps, log in to platforms, and open browsers across different device types. The only thing that currently works on any type of device and in any browser is HTML5.

Drum-roll please! The 2 digital tools I use to make HTML5 activities are:
Educaplay and H5P

Educaplay is great for beginners because everything is hosted right on their site with a free account.
Are you so sick of hearing students or parents say that an activity you sent them won't work on their device? The struggle is real when we are asking them to download apps, log in to platforms, and open browsers across different device types. The only thing that currently works on any type of device and in any browser is HTML5.
Click here to try an Educaplay activity I made.

H5P is for more experienced users and is great because having the activities on your own platform gives you full control over site speed and student access. You can practice building activities on the H5P site, but there are limited plays if you share the link with students. You'll need a website to host these activities on if you want to get serious about making your own. I go over this in detail in the tutorial.

Click here to try some H5P activities that I built for my elementary technology curriculum.

To learn how to use each of these tools, register for the Technology Toolbox for Teachers.

Help me spread the word about HTML5 activities!

Instead of spending your weekends making these digital activities for your students, why not ask your favorite TpT sellers to start making them? You can send them to this blog post or give them the information below ( I have a course for sellers on making these digital activities to sell).

I've been making activities in HTML5 for years and it is time consuming. I have added over 100 H5P activities into my elementary technology curriculum and I also have a few separate units available with smaller sets of skills. I realized that I can't make them fast enough to keep up with the ideas that teachers are sharing with me. There is a real need for HTML5 activities for all subject areas!

If you're a teacher then the Tech Toolbox membership is how to learn about these tools.
If you're interested in making these activities to sell, I have a separate course for that. Click to learn more about my Digital Resources Course.
Are you so sick of hearing students or parents say that an activity you sent them won't work on their device? The struggle is real when we are asking them to download apps, log in to platforms, and open browsers across different device types. The only thing that currently works on any type of device and in any browser is HTML5.

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Starting a Classroom Newsletter Students Get Excited About


Classroom newsletters don't have to be dry and boring. Classroom newsletters can be super fun and enjoyable. The Newsletter is the most classic way to engage and keep engaging your audience. The same goes for the Classroom Newsletter. It is a great way to give updates, remind of upcoming events, and have fun with kids and parents.
Classroom newsletters don't have to be dry and boring. Classroom newsletters can be super fun and enjoyable. The Newsletter is the most classic way to engage and keep engaging your audience. The same goes for the Classroom Newsletter. It is a great way to give updates, remind of upcoming events, and have fun with kids and parents.

Here, I’ll show you how to get started with your newsletter and make it something students look forward to as much as they look forward to recess! The first thing you’ll need to do is choose a template to build your newsletter and a way to send your newsletter. .

Choosing Your Template Or Newsletter Platform

There are a few different options to make your template. Mailchimp and TinyLetter are a good place to start. The basic price plans are free, and they are super easy to use. You can put in links, videos, and pictures to keep your audience engaged. These platforms are also mobile friendly, meaning that when your students and parents check their email on their phone, they are easier to read.

Smore.com is another awesome Newsletter Building platform that gives all the templates away for free for educators! There you can choose from tons of possible templates to keep things beautiful in the letter you send.

Getting to choose the template of the newsletter for the week could even be a reward for students, or it could be picked on a rotation in the class.

If you’re not interested in another platform or application, you can also use whatever mail client you normally use to make a template. Most mail platforms have the basic word processing and allow you to add in pictures, embed videos, and change colors and size of font.

Next, What Goes In Your Newsletter?

The key to a good Newsletter is eye catching simplicity. Too much to read, or difficulty navigating, is quickly going to end up in the trash. Those long, repetitive, too much emails are why Newsletters of all kinds get such a terrible reputation. But you know what your students want, you know what keeps their attention, keep it fun and interesting and they will look forward to your amazing email!

Here are some ideas on how to organize and sections of your newsletter.

Welcome Section.

This is a short and sweet hello, what has class been up to, and what is in this newsletter that matters to YOU. It might be quick update of upcoming events and links to what the students/parents need to do to prepare.

The Welcome Section could even be a quick video that you or a student puts together like quick announcements. Each week a different student could make the welcome video for the newsletter.

The Meat In The Middle

There are so many ways you can build the meat in the middle of your newsletter. Ask the students to vote on what goes into it. Here is a list of ideas where students can submit work and creative media:
-       Jokes
-       Memes
-       Riddles
-       Student of the week
-       Sports section
-       Comic section
-       Special featuring student work--writing, poetry, art, music.
-       A short story that is “to be continued” each week
-       Pictures from past presentations, field trips, or events.
-       Recommended reading, videos, or math extras

Closing

Since you made a rockin’ newsletter, I’m sure the kids have made it all the way to the bottom. Which leads to another idea: have a riddle or joke at the beginning and then answer it at the end!

Anyway, at the end of the newsletter, it’s important to reiterate important upcoming deadlines or events. The newsletter may be fun, but it is also business.


While the possibilities are truly endless with what you can do, still try and keep it short and sweet. Give your students something to show off and new ways to connect with each other creatively. 
Classroom newsletters don't have to be dry and boring. Classroom newsletters can be super fun and enjoyable. The Newsletter is the most classic way to engage and keep engaging your audience. The same goes for the Classroom Newsletter. It is a great way to give updates, remind of upcoming events, and have fun with kids and parents.

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9 Quick Tips for Google Classroom


In no particular order, here are my 9 tips and tricks that you can use to be more efficient when using Google Classroom.

9 Quick Tips for Google Classroom

In no particular order, here are my 9 tips and tricks that you can use to be more efficient when using Google Classroom. 

1. Reuse assignments across multiple classes.

After you schedule an assignment for one class, go to the other class you want to schedule it for and click the + sign and hit the reuse button. Select the class you posted the other assignment in and choose the assignment you want to post.

2. Use Google Slides to Link Assignments

Make one master Google Slides file for the week to share with students. Then within the Google Slides file, link to each day’s assignment(s). That way students only need to find one assignment in Classroom.

3. Use Topics to Stay Organized

When students click on the Class Work Tab they can see each file organized by Topic if you take the time to organize your units into Topics. 

4. Use The Comment Bank to Speed Up Feedback

Copy and paste comments from the Comment Bank to speed up your process of giving students feedback.

5. Use the Slip-in-Slide Extension for Changes

If you change your document in google you have to reattach it to Classroom or the kids won’t get the new copy. OR, save yourself a ton of effort and use the browser extension to add a slide to all of the student copies!

6. Turn Off the Google Meets Icon in Classroom

Otherwise students can access the meet when you’re not there to present.

7. Turn Off Assignments Posting to the Stream

That way the Stream is used for announcements and is more likely students will actually see your important information.

8. Use Digital Stickers to Give Feedback

After students have turned in an assignment, add a private comment to give them feedback. Use Bitmojis or other digital stickers to add some color and positive reinforcement!

9. Use the Question Feature as an Exit Ticket

See what your students are learning with a quick exit ticket. Use the Question feature to have the answers all in one place.
Love tech tutorials and want more of them? Subscribe to the Technology Toolbox for Teachers. A one-stop library of technology tools tutorials for teachers. Click the image for more information and to see sample tutorials. 

Is there anything else you would add? Let me know in the comments! Otherwise, pin this post to get back to later. 
In no particular order, here are my 9 tips and tricks that you can use to be more efficient when using Google Classroom.
If you need your upper elementary students to know how to navigate a Google Classroom Assignment, check out this resource:

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Class Website 101


Do you have a class website yet? If you do, is it aimed mostly at parents or students? I would like to challenge you to change the way you think of class websites and move toward using yours like a Learning Management System.     The benefits are numerous, but the most important one is all of the time it will save you. Let me show you!
Do you have a class website yet? If you do, is it aimed mostly at parents or students? I would like to challenge you to change the way you think of class websites and move toward using yours like a Learning Management System.

The benefits are numerous, but the most important one is all of the time it will save you. Let me show you!

Reasons Why You Need a Class Website

In no particular order, these are 6 reasons why you need a class website:
1. Have everything in one place
2. Easy access to information for students and parents
3. Can replace a Learning Management System
4. Full control over your content
5. Set up each lesson once and then benefit from that effort for years!
6. Students develop digital literacy with regular use
This GIF is you after you've build your class website!

Picking a Website Builder Platform

There are some great website building platforms out there and you can use any one you like. I build mine in Weebly because I like the ease of the click and drag interface. Each lesson I build has some basic components that are the same, so using the features in weebly I am able to copy a page and then just change out a few elements for each lesson. 
If you need help with building a weebly website, I have a set of tutorials for teachers:
https://www.teacherspayteachers.com/Product/Class-Website-with-Weebly-Tutorials-3277862
Other platforms to consider include Google Sites, Wix, and Wordpress. There isn't a wrong choice here, it just depends on your comfort level with getting started. Weebly is by far the most user friendly website builder I've ever used.  

Things to Include in Your Class Website

Here are some things every class website needs:
1. Pages. Lots and lots of pages makes it more organized and accessible. Scrolling for days to find today's content is not student-friendly. You'll need a page for each lesson, a page for early finisher links, a page for your contact info, a page for announcements, etc.
Do you have a class website yet? If you do, is it aimed mostly at parents or students? I would like to challenge you to change the way you think of class websites and move toward using yours like a Learning Management System.     The benefits are numerous, but the most important one is all of the time it will save you. Let me show you!

2. Lesson Pages (see more on this in the next section)
3. Early Finisher links. This example  is what I use for grades 3-5 in the computer lab:
Do you have a class website yet? If you do, is it aimed mostly at parents or students? I would like to challenge you to change the way you think of class websites and move toward using yours like a Learning Management System.     The benefits are numerous, but the most important one is all of the time it will save you. Let me show you!

4. Your contact information possibly with an embedded form so that parents can submit it without needing to open their email app. 
5. Syllabus or information about your class like schedules and expectations. Consider making this page password protected so that the info couldn't get into the wrong hands.

How to Use Your Class Website Like a Learning Management System

Possibly my favorite part of having a class website for the past 7+ years is that I don't need a separate learning management system. I use a modified flipped classroom approach, which means that students watch instructional videos I made from their own computers instead of me standing in front of the class to give instruction. Check out this blog post if you need guidance for making instructional videos.

Here are the steps for creating a class website that can be used like a learning management system:
1. Set up each lesson on its own page. You'll thank yourself later if you take the time to do this. My class website has over 200 pages accessible from the main menu (teaching technology to grades k-5 means 40 weeks of lessons per grade level).

2. On each lesson page, include the instructions with text and video, link to the files for the students to use, and a way for them to turn it back in. Depending on the website builder you choose, there are options to have students upload a file. You can also use a tool like Padlet or a Google Form for students to upload assignments.
Do you have a class website yet? If you do, is it aimed mostly at parents or students? I would like to challenge you to change the way you think of class websites and move toward using yours like a Learning Management System.     The benefits are numerous, but the most important one is all of the time it will save you. Let me show you!

Do you have a class website yet? If you do, is it aimed mostly at parents or students? I would like to challenge you to change the way you think of class websites and move toward using yours like a Learning Management System.     The benefits are numerous, but the most important one is all of the time it will save you. Let me show you!

Do you have a class website yet? If you do, is it aimed mostly at parents or students? I would like to challenge you to change the way you think of class websites and move toward using yours like a Learning Management System.     The benefits are numerous, but the most important one is all of the time it will save you. Let me show you!
You can password protect the lesson pages if you have any files you've purchased from TpT that you want to pass to your students. Passwords keeps the files secure and keeps you out of DMCA trouble.
3. Create a space for announcements. Usually on the homepage. This is the area you'll plan to update regularly. The rest of the pages need to be built and then only maintained if plans change. Otherwise they are kind of like set it and forget it.

How to Use Your Class Website During School

One of the best parts of having a class website is using it!

Set up assignments that students access during the school day. It could be at centers or as an individual assignment. With everything set up on the lesson page, students can get right to work and then you can facilitate the lesson.

Walk around and help students individually as needed instead of lecturing from the front of the classroom! It is a game changer for your energy level and for student engagement.

Next year when you get to the same assignment, the work is already done! If you were using a learning management system you'd have to copy and paste the info for the assignment over again the next time. With a class website you can just double check that the links and files still work and you're good to go.

So, what do you think? Could you see yourself using a class website in this way? I'd love to see your site when you build it!

Do you have a class website yet? If you do, is it aimed mostly at parents or students? I would like to challenge you to change the way you think of class websites and move toward using yours like a Learning Management System.     The benefits are numerous, but the most important one is all of the time it will save you. Let me show you!


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4th Grade Digital ELA Activities


If you're sick of cleaning up after doing interactive notebook pages (paper scraps, glue sticks, missing pieces, etc.) then you are going to love these DIGITAL ELA reading and language activities for your 4th grade students.
If you're sick of cleaning up after doing interactive notebook pages (paper scraps, glue sticks, missing pieces, etc.) then you are going to love these DIGITAL ELA reading and language activities for your 4th grade students.

What is a Digital Resource Library?

In my Google Drive I have folders with the language and reading activities. I'm calling it a digital resource library because all of the resources are digital, and they are arranged for you to be able to quickly choose which topic you want to look at and use. 
If you're sick of cleaning up after doing interactive notebook pages (paper scraps, glue sticks, missing pieces, etc.) then you are going to love these DIGITAL ELA reading and language activities for your 4th grade students.

All you have to do is make a copy of each file in the folder (there's a google extension that makes this really easy) and then they are yours to use with your students.

Are they Common Core Aligned?

Yes, I used the common core standards as a guide when creating these activities and graphic organizers. There is an alignment guide in each folder. That being said, there are no CCSS indicators in the actual google slides files, so if you don't use the CCSS you can still use these activities. 

Along with this topic, they also don't have 4th grade anywhere on them except in the file title. If you rename it you can use it as differentiation for any grade level student(s). 
If you're sick of cleaning up after doing interactive notebook pages (paper scraps, glue sticks, missing pieces, etc.) then you are going to love these DIGITAL ELA reading and language activities for your 4th grade students.

Do I have to have Google Classroom to use this?

No! The folders are on my Google Drive, but the actual activities are in Google Slides, which can easily be downloaded as a PowerPoint file and it doesn't lose any functionality. All you have to take care of is a way to share the files with your students. Sure, Google Classroom makes it a bit easier to share a file, but there are plenty of other ways. You can even upload them to a password protected page on your class website, or into a learning management system like Schoology or Sharepoint in order for your students to access the files. If you have any questions about this, please ask. 

So these are like Interactive Notebooks, but Digital?

Yes, exactly! The Language activities have click and drag, typing, and related online games. The Reading activities are graphic organizers that can be used with ANY text. The best part is that each file has an anchor chart so you could even assign these as homework and the parents would be able to help based on the anchor charts! 
If you're sick of cleaning up after doing interactive notebook pages (paper scraps, glue sticks, missing pieces, etc.) then you are going to love these DIGITAL ELA reading and language activities for your 4th grade students.

If you're sick of cleaning up after doing interactive notebook pages (paper scraps, glue sticks, missing pieces, etc.) then you are going to love these DIGITAL ELA reading and language activities for your 4th grade students.

If you're sick of cleaning up after doing interactive notebook pages (paper scraps, glue sticks, missing pieces, etc.) then you are going to love these DIGITAL ELA reading and language activities for your 4th grade students.

So, do you think your students would like to complete their ELA work digitally?

Pin this post to get back to later:
If you're sick of cleaning up after doing interactive notebook pages (paper scraps, glue sticks, missing pieces, etc.) then you are going to love these DIGITAL ELA reading and language activities for your 4th grade students.


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Brittany Washburn
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1st Grade Software Lessons for the Computer Lab


1st grade students can do more on devices than we expect. With lessons and activities that follow a consistent setup and process, first graders can do just about anything in the software programs.   These Spiral Review technology lessons that teach presentation, word processing, and spreadsheet software for 1st grade over 12 sessions. These will make a great addition to your technology curriculum for the computer lab.
1st grade students can do more on devices than we expect. With lessons and activities that follow a consistent setup and process, first graders can do just about anything in the software programs. 
These Spiral Review technology lessons that teach presentation, word processing, and spreadsheet software for 1st grade over 12 sessions. These will make a great addition to your technology curriculum for the computer lab. The skills build on each other throughout this unit so it is important to do the lessons in order. Each set of 12 weeks are all on the same topic, so students can take a deep dive into the content and the tech skills.

Weeks 1-12: Farm Animals

Week 1
PRESENTATION
Farm Animals Drag and Drop
Week 2
PRESENTATION
Farm Animals Font Size
Week 3
PRESENTATION
Farm Animals Type Labels
Week 4
PRESENTATION
Farm Animals Patterns
Week 5
WORD PROCESSING
Farm Animals Type Names
Week 6
WORD PROCESSING
Farm Animals Sorting
Week 7
WORD PROCESSING
Farm Animals Fix the Text
Week 8
WORD PROCESSING
Farm Animals Font Colors
Week 9
SPREADSHEETS
Farm Animals Data Chart
Week 10
SPREADSHEETS
Farm Animals Data Line Graph
Week 11
SPREADSHEETS
Farm Animals Data Bar Graph
Week 12
SPREADSHEETS
Farm Animals Data Pie Graph
1st grade students can do more on devices than we expect. With lessons and activities that follow a consistent setup and process, first graders can do just about anything in the software programs.   These Spiral Review technology lessons that teach presentation, word processing, and spreadsheet software for 1st grade over 12 sessions. These will make a great addition to your technology curriculum for the computer lab.

Weeks 13-24: Bugs

Week 13
PRESENTATION
Bugs Drag and Drop
Week 14
PRESENTATION
Bugs Type Labels
Week 15
PRESENTATION
Bugs Copy and Paste
Week 16
PRESENTATION
Bugs Design the Presentation
Week 17
WORD PROCESSING
Bugs Type Names
Week 18
WORD PROCESSING
Bugs Sorting
Week 19
WORD PROCESSING
Bugs Fix the Text
Week 20
WORD PROCESSING
Bugs Font and Colors
Week 21
SPREADSHEETS
Bugs Data Chart
Week 22
SPREADSHEETS
Bugs Data Scatter Graph
Week 23
SPREADSHEETS
Bugs Data Column Graph
Week 24
SPREADSHEETS
Bugs Data Line Graph
1st grade students can do more on devices than we expect. With lessons and activities that follow a consistent setup and process, first graders can do just about anything in the software programs.   These Spiral Review technology lessons that teach presentation, word processing, and spreadsheet software for 1st grade over 12 sessions. These will make a great addition to your technology curriculum for the computer lab.

Weeks 25-36: Keyboards and Typing

Week 25
PRESENTATION
Keyboard Drag and Drop
Week 26
PRESENTATION
Keyboard Type Letters
Week 27
PRESENTATION
Keyboard Change Fonts
Week 28
PRESENTATION
Keyboard Phonics Drag and Drop
Week 29
WORD PROCESSING
Keyboard Type Sight Words
Week 30
WORD PROCESSING
Keyboard Change Fonts
Week 31
WORD PROCESSING
Keyboard Fix the Text
Week 32
WORD PROCESSING
Keyboard Keys Sorting Drag and Drop
Week 33
SPREADSHEETS
Keyboard Data Chart
Week 34
SPREADSHEETS
Keyboard Data Line Graph
Week 35
SPREADSHEETS
Keyboard Data Column Graph
Week 36
SPREADSHEETS
Keyboard Data Choice Graph
1st grade students can do more on devices than we expect. With lessons and activities that follow a consistent setup and process, first graders can do just about anything in the software programs.   These Spiral Review technology lessons that teach presentation, word processing, and spreadsheet software for 1st grade over 12 sessions. These will make a great addition to your technology curriculum for the computer lab.
What is included:
4 weeks of lessons for each type of software
  • Word / Docs / Pages
  • PowerPoint / Slides / Keynote
  • Excel / Sheets / Numbers
Customizable for whatever software version you have
Editable Lesson Plans:
•Mini lesson
•Vocabulary
•Materials
•I Can Statements
•Lesson components
•Exit Ticket Questions
•Space for reflection
1st grade students can do more on devices than we expect. With lessons and activities that follow a consistent setup and process, first graders can do just about anything in the software programs.   These Spiral Review technology lessons that teach presentation, word processing, and spreadsheet software for 1st grade over 12 sessions. These will make a great addition to your technology curriculum for the computer lab.
Editable Daily Messages:
•Lesson Title
•Vocabulary
•Materials
•I Can Statements
•Lesson Question
•Space for you to add screenshots of your software program
1st grade students can do more on devices than we expect. With lessons and activities that follow a consistent setup and process, first graders can do just about anything in the software programs.   These Spiral Review technology lessons that teach presentation, word processing, and spreadsheet software for 1st grade over 12 sessions. These will make a great addition to your technology curriculum for the computer lab.
Student Templates Provided
•Templates will convert to any version of software programs, but are provided in Office 365
1st grade students can do more on devices than we expect. With lessons and activities that follow a consistent setup and process, first graders can do just about anything in the software programs.   These Spiral Review technology lessons that teach presentation, word processing, and spreadsheet software for 1st grade over 12 sessions. These will make a great addition to your technology curriculum for the computer lab.
Student Exit Ticket:
•Formative assessment questions provided as an editable Google Form to use with every lesson
1st grade students can do more on devices than we expect. With lessons and activities that follow a consistent setup and process, first graders can do just about anything in the software programs.   These Spiral Review technology lessons that teach presentation, word processing, and spreadsheet software for 1st grade over 12 sessions. These will make a great addition to your technology curriculum for the computer lab.

TEACHING TIPS

1. These lessons are the main activity for a class. I recommend planning a warm up activity (like 10 minutes of typing) and early finisher activities (here are sites you can use). You’re likely going to have some students complete the lesson in 5-10 minutes and others that will still be working when you say time is up.
2. In the lesson plans you’ll see me talk about screencasts you could make. If you’ve never made them before, check out this blog post to learn more about it. Screencasts are a game changer!
3. You may upload the student templates to a learning management system or password protected page of your own website. As long as the files aren’t available publicly on the web then you’re following the terms of use. If you need ideas for how to share files with students, read this blog post.
4. The assessment can be thought of as exit tickets and is optional. It will be helpful if technology is a graded subject and should be used to inform your instruction.
If you’re new to teaching technology and curious about grading these skills, read this blog post.

WHO NEEDS THESE TECHNOLOGY LESSONS?

These software lessons are perfect for technology teachers, classroom teachers, media specialists, STEM teachers, or homeschool parents who want their students to know how to use technology to create content. By mastering these software programs, students will feel comfortable doing anything you ask them to do with it.

HOW ARE THESE DIFFERENT FROM YOUR TECHNOLOGY CURRICULUM?

The k5tech.net curriculum has warm ups and early finisher activities plus it is all housed on my website. These software lessons are just the main activity and assessments and I'm providing you with all of the files to put into your learning management system. The content in these software lessons does not overlap with the k5tech.net curriculum at all so you can use both.


Still have questions? Please ask them before purchasing.

Buy 1st Grade Software Lessons on TpT

Buy 1st Grade Software Lessons on K5tech.net

1st grade students can do more on devices than we expect. With lessons and activities that follow a consistent setup and process, first graders can do just about anything in the software programs.   These Spiral Review technology lessons that teach presentation, word processing, and spreadsheet software for 1st grade over 12 sessions. These will make a great addition to your technology curriculum for the computer lab.

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Brittany Washburn
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