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It's Time to STOP Cyberbullying


From kids to adults, cyberbullying is running rampant. As tech teachers, there is a responsibility to teach students about being good (and aware) digital citizens. If our students aren't the perpetrators or the victims - they're the witnesses. In this post I’m going to cover what cyberbullying looks like, what to do about it, and how to stop it.

From kids to adults, cyberbullying is running rampant. As tech teachers, there is a responsibility to teach students about being good (and aware) digital citizens. If our students aren't the perpetrators or the victims - they're the witnesses. In this post I’m going to cover what cyberbullying looks like, what to do about it, and how to stop it.

What does cyberbullying look like?

Cyberbullying has impact all over the world, and it looks the same in many places. When it comes to cyberbullying, it can look a lot like regular bullying. Cyberbullying is attacking someone through the internet. It can include insults, threats, gossip, rumors, and harassment. Cyberbullying could include hacking someone’s account, or pretending to be someone else to humiliate the victim. It could be in the form of words or video or pictures. It could be on any social media platform, email, or text messaging. The bottom line of cyberbullying is that a perpetrator is purposefully doing something mean to someone else for the sole purpose of hurting or humiliating them. So, it doesn’t really matter how it is done, the intent is always malicious.

For perpetrators of cyberbullying… Remember to emphasize that what a person says on the internet is not private, and will be interpreted in the worst possible light. Even if a student says, “It was just a joke,” it doesn’t matter in a court of law. Whatever the words say, they will be interpreted literally (especially in the case of threatening). Try to always be kind everywhere, including the internet.

From kids to adults, cyberbullying is running rampant. As tech teachers, there is a responsibility to teach students about being good (and aware) digital citizens. If our students aren't the perpetrators or the victims - they're the witnesses. In this post I’m going to cover what cyberbullying looks like, what to do about it, and how to stop it.

What to do about and how to stop cyberbullying?

It seems like every time I do a lesson on cyberbullying, within the next week or two it comes up in class where someone did something that they were just told not to do. Likewise, it’s important to note in the lesson that there may be students in the room who are victims, perpetrators, or witnesses of cyberbullying.

For the victims… There is a good chance that if you’re on the internet, expressing your opinion, someone else on the internet will insult or heckle you (even if you don’t know who they are). So, one of the ways to stay safe is to keep your social media, phone number, and email private. Do not share this information with anyone who you don’t know.

Block people. And if someone continues to change their information to harass, then get help from an adult and report the person to the social platform.

For witnesses… Do something. Encourage the person who is being picked on online. Say something nice. Don’t laugh. Don’t help the perpetrator. Tell an adult about it. Report them to the social media platform. Don’t spread the rumors and gossip. Be there for the person in need.

From kids to adults, cyberbullying is running rampant. As tech teachers, there is a responsibility to teach students about being good (and aware) digital citizens. If our students aren't the perpetrators or the victims - they're the witnesses. In this post I’m going to cover what cyberbullying looks like, what to do about it, and how to stop it.

Flood the internet with good things. One of the ways to “undo” the effects of cyberbullying is to flood the internet with good information about the person who is the victim. Instead of attacking the cyberbully, create lots of social media posts and information that is positive and uplifting to drown out the negative voices. Students can get their friends together, teachers, parents, and push the negativity to the bottom where it can’t be seen or experienced as easy.

From kids to adults, cyberbullying is running rampant. As tech teachers, there is a responsibility to teach students about being good (and aware) digital citizens. If our students aren't the perpetrators or the victims - they're the witnesses. In this post I’m going to cover what cyberbullying looks like, what to do about it, and how to stop it.

More than anything, it is important for witnesses to help the victims, and it is important for students to report and ask for help. The internet is an amazing place, but try not to fight negativity with negativity. Instead, drown out the negativity with positivity.



How do you address cyberbullying in the classroom? What is your experience?

From kids to adults, cyberbullying is running rampant. As tech teachers, there is a responsibility to teach students about being good (and aware) digital citizens. If our students aren't the perpetrators or the victims - they're the witnesses. In this post I’m going to cover what cyberbullying looks like, what to do about it, and how to stop it.

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Brittany Washburn
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